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Thread: Daylight saving time 2011 begins Sunday, March 13

  1. #1
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    Default Daylight saving time 2011 begins Sunday, March 13

    Daylight savings time (DST) begins this Sunday, March 13, 2011; but, what is the history of the practice of setting our clocks forward?

    Daylight saving time (or, as many countries call it, summertime), is simply a way for society to get more daylight into days by advancing the clock one hour during the summer, allowing the sun to rise an hour earlier, according to our clocks, and set an hour later, making the day longer.

    In the Northern Hemisphere, daylight saving time (DST) begins between March and April, and ends between September and November. In the Southern Hemisphere, DST begins between September and November, and ends between March and April. Many countries in both hemispheres do observe DST. American states and territories that do not observe DST include Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands and American Samoa.

    There are various reasons areas observe DST. The main reason is simply making better use of daylight in the evenings. Some people feel that the longer daylight in the evening may reduce accidents and injuries, particularly driving. Social time may be extended with more daylight in the evening, many hoping it gives families greater opportunity to spend time together. And, some tourism industries find that their business is increased by the extended evening daylight hours. Whether or not DST actually saves energy is a matter of debate, with some studies indicating that less artificial light is used during DST than during standard time, while other studies claim that no significant savings is recorded.

    In 2007, the United States, Canada, and some additional countries extended the DST period. Previously, the DST period began on the first Sunday in April and ended the last Sunday in October. Now, DST begins for these areas the second Sunday in March and ends the first Sunday in November.

    DST was first suggested by Benjamin Franklin in 1784. However, modern DST was proposed by George Vernon Hudson in 1895. Hudson, an entomologist from New Zealand, suggested a two-hour daylight saving shift to the Wellington Philosophical Society. But, DST is credited to William Willett, an English builder. In 1905, Willett proposed that the clock be moved forward during the summer. The proposal went before the House of Commons in February 1908, but was not actually put into practice until 1916, during World War I, when several European countries implemented DST. Thus, spring forward, fall back was born. At different periods in history, the amount of the adjustment has been tweaked, but the standard time change is one hour. Also, there have been periods when DST has been used throughout the year, such as in the United States during World War II, from Feb. 3, 1942 until Sept. 30, 1945, when it was deemed War Time.

    This spring, DST begins on Sunday, Mar. 13, 2011, at 2 a.m.

    For more information about daylight saving time, visit TimeandDate.com.
    Nếu c một định, c một Cch!.
    Nếu c một Cch, ở đ cũng l một định.

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Tnh Qu For This Useful Post:

    bng-la (03-08-2011), chieunhatnang (03-08-2011), Kiến Hi (03-08-2011), Lida (03-08-2011), TTL (03-08-2011)

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    Default Re: Daylight saving time 2011 begins Sunday, March 13

    Quote Originally Posted by Tnh Qu View Post
    Daylight savings time (DST) begins this Sunday, March 13, 2011; but, what is the history of the practice of setting our clocks forward?

    Daylight saving time (or, as many countries call it, summertime), is simply a way for society to get more daylight into days by advancing the clock one hour during the summer, allowing the sun to rise an hour earlier, according to our clocks, and set an hour later, making the day longer.

    In the Northern Hemisphere, daylight saving time (DST) begins between March and April, and ends between September and November. In the Southern Hemisphere, DST begins between September and November, and ends between March and April. Many countries in both hemispheres do observe DST. American states and territories that do not observe DST include Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands and American Samoa.

    There are various reasons areas observe DST. The main reason is simply making better use of daylight in the evenings. Some people feel that the longer daylight in the evening may reduce accidents and injuries, particularly driving. Social time may be extended with more daylight in the evening, many hoping it gives families greater opportunity to spend time together. And, some tourism industries find that their business is increased by the extended evening daylight hours. Whether or not DST actually saves energy is a matter of debate, with some studies indicating that less artificial light is used during DST than during standard time, while other studies claim that no significant savings is recorded.

    In 2007, the United States, Canada, and some additional countries extended the DST period. Previously, the DST period began on the first Sunday in April and ended the last Sunday in October. Now, DST begins for these areas the second Sunday in March and ends the first Sunday in November.

    DST was first suggested by Benjamin Franklin in 1784. However, modern DST was proposed by George Vernon Hudson in 1895. Hudson, an entomologist from New Zealand, suggested a two-hour daylight saving shift to the Wellington Philosophical Society. But, DST is credited to William Willett, an English builder. In 1905, Willett proposed that the clock be moved forward during the summer. The proposal went before the House of Commons in February 1908, but was not actually put into practice until 1916, during World War I, when several European countries implemented DST. Thus, spring forward, fall back was born. At different periods in history, the amount of the adjustment has been tweaked, but the standard time change is one hour. Also, there have been periods when DST has been used throughout the year, such as in the United States during World War II, from Feb. 3, 1942 until Sept. 30, 1945, when it was deemed War Time.

    This spring, DST begins on Sunday, Mar. 13, 2011, at 2 a.m.

    For more information about daylight saving time, visit TimeandDate.com.
    TQ.
    Vậy l chủ nhật ny mnh mất một tiếng đồng hồ để ngủ

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